Expose Concert Series Promotions

#4     |    #5
#3
SPACESHIP EYES with
Attila & Dave Project
and Infinity

@ The Club Kaos
in Fremont, CA
JANUARY 10,1997

Band Links:
Spaceship Eyes
Attila and Dave Project

ECSP #3 Poster

Concert Reviews and Commentary:
REVIEW BY PETER THELEN
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, EXPOSÉ MAGAZINE

The third event in the Exposé concert series at Club Kaos in Fremont, CA opened with a return performance by the Atilla & Dave Project, a trio from the East Bay. In the two months that had elapsed since they opened the first ECSP gig, the band has been playing quite regularly, and even did a short tour of the Pacific Northwest. They were on stage a little after 9 p.m. and played for a bit over an hour, covering most of the material on their newly released CD which was available for the first time at this show (refer to our roundtable review in issue #11). In all, another great set by these guys.

Second up was Infinity. Some background: Infinity was a working band in the Bay Area in the late seventies; they recorded, but never released on album. A couple of years ago, the band went to Greg Walker of Syn-Phonic with the tapes for their original album, plus other recordings that had been made by various band members in the years since. The interest led to a band reformation, and release of a CD. The Exposé show would be a culmination of many months of practice, the band's first live gig in over fifteen years. Sadly, only a few days before this gig, the lead guitarist/vocalist quit, leaving the band with a decision to make: Cancel the Exposé gig, or play it without him. Thankfully they chose the latter. As it was, there were six people on stage: two keyboardists (one doubling on flute and sax, both adding vocals), bass, drums, second guitarist/vocalist, and a backing vocalist. Their music is typically progressive in the seventies sense: like Gentle Giant or Yes, they create multi-part harmonies over a bed of strong symphonic rock with plenty of tight meter changes and enough classical, jazz and folk influences to keep their music fresh. At times – especially early in their set, it was evident that they were a little shy of a full deck in the vocal department; still, the other band members did an admirable job covering for their missing person, and averted what could have been a total disaster for a less talented band.

Last up was Spaceship Eyes, a six-piece from San Francisco featuring keyboards, guitar, bass, drums, tabla, tapes, toys and poetry, let by ex-Melting Euphoria/Thessalonians keyboardist Don Falcone, and featuring ex-Cartoon/PFS drummer Gary Parra. The band had printed a full-color program for their set and distributed it before the show. Their sound could be described as a mix of psychedelic space-rock and ambient, with measured doses of avant-gardisms in their mix. Only a couple poems read by Falcone over swirling psychedelic musical backdrops punctuated the otherwise instrumental set. The energy was cyclical, as they would regularly switch between their ambient tendencies and periods of hard-driving space rock. They covered material from their upcoming 'Kamarupa' CD, as well as one tune each from Melting Euphoria and Parra's Trap project. All of their tunes blended together seamlessly into one long eighty-minute continuum, with few places to pause for applause. The crowd was stunned in disbelief while Parra threw his cymbals down on his snare, swung a chain around hitting various percussive things, and played with two or three drumsticks in each hand, while Karen Anderson ran tapes while playing a toy snake and other unusual items. Overall, a very unusual and powerful set that the audience won't soon forget. End of text
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#4
SPIRIT CIRCLE with
Noodle
@ The Club Kaos
in Fremont, CA
SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15, 1997
Concert Reviews and Commentary:
REVIEW BY PETER THELEN
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, EXPOSÉ MAGAZINE

Because February 14th was Valentines Day, the Exposé concert was moved to Saturday afternoon on the following day, and combined with a barbecue and music vendor showcase. Reps from the GEP and Kinesis labels, CD Warehouse stores, and local favorite Ranjit Padmanabhan (of Progtron) were on hand with a multitude of titles for sale. In addition, all of the bands that played in previous Exposé shows were invited to sell their tapes and discs. The vendors set up on the sidelines while the barbecue happened outside the doors of the club… all this during daylight hours.

ECSP #4 Poster
The first band to take the stage was Noodle, a five-piece band from the North Bay, playing a rich stew of eclectic space-fusion-rock originals, featuring dual guitars and plenty of energy.Their material often seems improvisational in nature, generally structured but with much room for soloing. They use vocals sparingly – sometimes sung or almost spoken, along with tapes and effects. They played a nice long set to a very receptive audience, most of whom had never seen (or even heard of) this band.

After a brief break, Spiritcircle (from Sacramento) began their set, they had opened the second gig in the series back in December, and as a result created quite a stir, so many in the crowd were anticipating hearing the band play a longer set as headliners. And indeed they did – six long tunes, two of which had never before been heard by Bay Area audiences. Their sound is a compositionally-based fairly complex progressive rock featuring guitars, bass, keys and drums, with a powerful vocal presence in lead singer Torin Finney. As usual, their playing was tight and the performance spirited, at least as good as their show two months before. End of text
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#5
HIGH BIRD with
Call To Arms
@ The Club Kaos
in Fremont, CA
FRIDAY MARCH 14, 1997
Concert Reviews and Commentary:
REVIEW BY PETER THELEN
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, EXPOSÉ MAGAZINE
ECSP #5 Poster
The fifth show in the Exposé concert series was opened by the local four-piece neo-progressive/prog-metal band Call To Arms, who worked through a one-hour set of original material. Their sound seems to be strongly influenced by bands such as Rainbow and Dream Theater, with a very imposing guitar presence, tight rhythm section, but lacking the vocal power of the aforementioned bands. Their newer material seemed to be a lot stronger and also more instrumentally oriented, with more of a lead role for keyboards. The drew a large crowd of dedicated fans to the show, but sadly a good percentage of these fans walked out of the club before the next band came on,
never even giving them a chance.
High Bird is a trio of guitar, drums, and bass/keys from
Palo Alto, they have an outstanding reputation from their years of gigging in the area. They went on at about 11:30 p.m., and started with an impressive guitar driven original before launching into a full-throttle rendition of King Crimson's 'Red,' which drove the last of the Call To Arms fans out the door, leaving about thirty-five diehards to enjoy the rest of the show. After another original, the band treated the audience to a cover medley of 'Hairless Heart,' 'Phantom of the Opera' and 'Jesus Christ Superstar'! Mostly their original material had a strong Crimson influence with some engaging symphonic and psychedelic touches, and was instrumentally oriented for the most part (the drummer supplied whatever limited vocals were needed); in fact some of their originals sounded like lost tracks from the 'Starless and Bible Black era. After a couple more originals, a familiar organ intro was played – no, it couldn't be… 'In A Gadda Da Vida,' complete the first part of the original (thump, thump, thump…) lame drum solo, followed by an impressive demonstration of what the drum solo should have sounded like! The balance of their set was split between originals and a cover of 'Vrooom,' after which demands for an encore brought them back for a cover of 'White Room' (originally by Cream circa 1969). In all, High Bird were a talented and fun diversion that were well received by those who stayed until the end. End of text

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